Diesel Injector Replacement, Done Right!

Diesel motors are the top choice for hard working vehicles as they provide enhanced durability, torque, and towing capacity. Diesels are designed to work harder and last longer than their gas counterparts, and in order to achieve that desired lifespan they must receive regular maintenance. Just as these motors are specifically chosen for their role, techs must often utilize specialized tools in order to properly service them.

Diesel injector replacements are one of the most common service items, and while not an overly complex job, there are several finer points that must be addressed to avoid comebacks and potential lost business.  In particular, ensuring a proper seal, which is critical to avoiding lost compression, fuel leaking into the coolant, and carbon contamination. Like any job where a tight seal is paramount, the key is properly cleaning all seating surfaces. This task required a bit of improvisation in the past, most often with rags, but with IPA®’s new Professional Diesel Injector-Seat Cleaning Kits, a truly professional solution is now available.

The 17-piece brush kits are available in Stainless Steel (#8090S) and Brass (#8090B) to provide hardness options. The included Helix Brushes, Two-Stage Brushes, Bore Brushes, various extensions, and SWAB-EEZ® cover most common light/medium and heavy-duty diesel applications. If you’ve ever pulled a diesel injector, you’ve noticed a series of successive O-rings typically along with a copper crush washer at the tip. These components are designed to seal with the injector cup (which may also need to be replaced at this time) and keep cylinder gasses out of the injector bore, and fuel out of your coolant/oil.

To prep, start by draining the fuel, removing the valve covers, and blowing any debris out of the way to avoid it ending up in the cylinders. It is now time to remove the injectors and strip off the old O-rings and copper washer. After the injectors are inspected for faults and cleaned properly, the new seals are installed. The selection of smaller bore brushes in the #8090 kits are great for cleaning here, as well as the included SWAB-EEZ® low-lint, industrial swabs. Once the injectors are done, it is time to address the injector cups. These will either need to be cleaned very well, or replaced. If the old cups are being retained, they should also be inspected for any cracks to avoid diesel leaking into coolant.

Whether you are replacing or just cleaning the cups, the IPA® Professional Diesel Injector-Seat Cleaning Kit truly provides the ultimate tools to ensure the process is done correctly. To clean, simply match up the injector body with the proper size/taper brush and use either the included ¼” hex hand driver or a low speed drill. Be sure to go slow, as aggressive, high-speed cleaning may do more harm than good. Again, the SWAB-EEZ® included in the kit will be a huge help here. If replacing cups, the seating surface must be cleaned well using the appropriate tapered brush. You will need an injector-specific cup puller and seating tool for optimal results, and be sure to utilize a sleeve retaining compound for added insurance. The last critical step in the process is properly torqueing down the injectors to ensure the copper washer functions as designed.

Your job is now done, and most importantly, done right with the help of the IPA® Professional Diesel Injector-Seat Cleaning Kit. These kits provide a professional solution, and save a great deal of time and frustration compared to improvising with rags, etc. to perform the most critical aspect of injector replacement.

Diesel injector seat cleaning kit
Diesel Injector Cleaning Kits
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  • Rick
    Reply

    Common Symptoms- When a fuel injector fails, you may experience hard starting, misfires, or an engine that lacks power. The fuel injectors may also leak fuel.
    Common Misdiagnoses- Fuel injectors may be replaced when the problem is actually dirty fuel filter(s), low engine compression, worn out glow plugs, failed fuel supply pump, defective glow plug relay, improper injector pump timing, and/or poor fuel quality.

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